Daily Archives: April 24, 2009

The FDA the New Regulatory Powers over Tobacco Products

The anti-smoking forces would give the Food and Drug Administration (FDA) key controls over the tobacco industry, but not the power to ban cigarettes and other tobacco products. Because they think that the new power over cigarettes would save the federal government some money.
The bill, which passed earlier this month, would also cost the multibillion-dollar tobacco industry $235 million in 2010 and more than $500 million a year by 2013, the Congressional Budget Office said.
It would save the federal government $5 million over five years and $2 million over 10 years, in part by reducing healthcare costs, the Congressional Budget Office (CBO) explained.
But state and local governments, which collected about $19 billion in 2008 from taxes on tobacco products, would lose more than $1 billion from 2010 to 2014.
The researchers said that the amount of tax revenues and settlement funds collected by state and local governments would decline as a result of the federal regulations authorized by this legislation because of lower consumption of tobacco products.
Rep. Henry Waxman, a California Democrat, calls for the FDA to set up a new center to regulate the marketing of cigarettes and other tobacco products as well as control nicotine content and package labels. It would charge Tobacco Company user fees to pay for the agency’s new workload.
But not all tobacco companies support the new bill. Only Altria Group Inc’s Philip Morris unit, the nation’s largest cigarette maker, supports it, as do some smaller companies. Because they consider that the new bill would reduce the number of children and teenagers who smoke 11 percent by 2019 and further curb the number of adult smokers by about 2 percent after 10 years.

Second-hand Smoke is Dangerous to our Children

Several laws are important for inhabitants’ better life, but only one legislation can protect the children’ health, smoking ban inside the cars.  This new legislation offers the opportunity to improve the health of Minnesota children too.

Smoking – A Big Health Problem

The most common cause of cancer deaths in men and women is lung cancer. There was a time when every movie star and teenage rebel was lighting up, but then some bright spark worked out that cigarettes smoking was the main cause of lung cancer. And everyone knows this, instead of this they continue to smoke.
BTW: smoking can cause also a lot of diseases such as heart and lung diseases, shortness of breath, heart attacks, emphysema, bronchitis, mouth and voice box cancers, bladder and stomach cancer, and possibly also breast cancer.

Annual Cost Savings From An Established State Tobacco-Prevention Program

As noted, California’s tobacco-control program secured substantial savings over the first seven years of its operation just from reducing smoking-affected births and smoking-caused heart attacks and strokes. Taken together, these savings more than covered the entire cost of the state’s program over that time period, by themselves, and produced even larger savings in the following years.12 For every single dollar the state has been spending on the California program it has been reducing statewide healthcare costs by more than $3.60 — with reductions in other smoking-caused costs saving another six dollars or more. Between 1990 and 1998 the California Tobacco Control Program saved an estimated $8. billion in overall smokingcaused costs and more than $3.0 billion in smoking-caused healthcare costs. In addition, these savings estimates for California do not even reflect the fact that since 1988 (the year before the California tobaccoprevention began), the rates of lung and bronchus cancer in California have declined more than five times as fast as they have in a sample of other areas of the U.S. (-14.0% vs. -2.7%). This decline is not only saving thousands of lives but also saving the state millions of dollars in medical costs with projected future
savings in the billions.
Because it started later, and is a smaller state (which faces higher per-capita costs to implement some key tobacco-control elements), the Massachusetts program has not yet enjoyed as large per-capita savings as the California tobacco prevention program. But a report by an economist at the Massachusetts Institute of Technology in 2000 found that the state’s program was already reducing statewide healthcare costs by $85 million per year – which means the state was annually reducing smoking-caused health care costs by at least two dollars for every single dollar it invested in its comprehensive tobacco-prevention efforts.
More recent research has added to these findings to show that state programs secure even larger returns on investment for sustained funding of tobacco prevention at adequate levels over ten or more years. Most notably, a more recent study of California’s tobacco prevention program found that for every dollar the state spent on its tobacco control program from 1989 to 2004, the state received tens of dollars in
savings in the form of sharp reductions to total healthcare costs in the state. This study confirms that the cost-saving benefits from sustained state investments in effective tobacco control programs quickly grow over time to dwarf the state expenditures, producing massive gains for the state not only in terms of both improved public health and increased worker productivity but in reduced government, business, and
household costs.
Similarly, an August 2008 Australian study found that for every dollar spent on a strong tobacco control program there (consisting primarily of aggressive anti-smoking television ads along with telephone quitlines and other support services to help smokers quit) the program reduced future healthcare costs by $70 over the lifetimes of the persons the program prompted to quit. This savings estimate was based on the study’s finding that for every 10,000 who quit because of the tobacco control program, more than 500 were saved from lung cancer, more than 600 escaped having heart attacks, at least 130 avoid suffering from a stroke, and more than 1700 were prevented from suffering from chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD).

Tobacco Use in Vermont

· High school students who smoke: 18.2% [Girls: 16.6% Boys: 19.7%]
· High school males who use smokeless tobacco: 14.1%
· Kids (under 18) who try cigarettes for the first time each year: 2,500
· Additional Kids (under 18) who become new regular, daily smokers each year: 700
· Packs of cigarettes bought or smoked by kids in Vermont each year: 1.5 million
· Kids exposed to second hand smoke at home: 42,000
· Adults in Vermont who smoke: 17.6% [Men: 19.4% Women: 15.8% Pregnant Females: 20.1%]
Nationwide, youth smoking has declined significantly since the mid-1990s, but that decline appears to have slowed. The
2007 Youth Risk Behavior Survey found that the percentage of high school students reporting that they have smoked
cigarettes in the past month decreased to 20 percent in 2007 from 23 percent in 2005. 19.8 percent of U.S. adults
(about 43.4 million) currently smoke, which is a significant decline from the 2006 rate of 20.8 percent.
Deaths in Vermont From Smoking
· Adults who die each year in Vermont from their own smoking: 800
· Adult nonsmokers who die each year from exposure to secondhand smoke: 90
· Vermont kids who have lost at least one parent to a smoking-caused death: 500
· Kids alive in state today who will ultimately die from smoking: 12,000 (given current smoking levels)
Smoking, alone, kills more people each year than alcohol, AIDS, car crashes, illegal drugs, murders, and suicides
combined. For every person in Vermont who dies from smoking approximately 20 more state residents are suffering from
serious smoking-caused disease and disability, or other tobacco-caused health problems.
Tobacco-Related Monetary Costs in Vermont
· Annual health care expenditures in the State directly caused by tobacco use: $233 million
· Annual health care expenditures in Vermont from secondhand smoke exposure: $9.4 million
 State Medicaid program’s total health expenditures caused by tobacco use: $72.0 million
· Citizens’ state/federal taxes to cover smoking-caused gov’t costs: $157.3 million ($623/household)
· Smoking-caused productivity losses in Vermont: $192 million
· Smoking-caused health costs and productivity losses per pack sold in Vermont: $10.04
The productivity loss amount, above, is from smoking-death-shortened work lives, alone. Additional work productivity
losses totaling in the tens of billions nationwide come from smoking-caused work absences, on-the-job performance
declines, and disability during otherwise productive work lives Other non-health costs caused by tobacco use include
direct residential and commercial property losses from smoking-caused fires (about $400 million nationwide); and the
costs of extra cleaning and maintenance made necessary by tobacco smoke and tobacco-related litter (about $4+ billion
per year for commercial establishments alone).
Tobacco Industry Advertising and Other Product Promotion
· Annual tobacco industry marketing expenditures nationwide: $13.4 billion ($36+ million per day)
· Estimated portion spent in Vermont each year: $28.2 million
Published research studies have found that kids are three times more sensitive to tobacco advertising than adults and
are more likely to be influenced to smoke by cigarette marketing than by peer pressure, and that one-third of underage
experimentation with smoking is attributable to tobacco company marketing.
Vermont Government Policies Affecting The Toll of Tobacco in Vermont
· Annual State tobacco prevention spending from tobacco settlement and tax revenues: $6.1 million
[National rank: 7 (with 1 the best), based on percent of CDC recommendation]
· State cigarette tax per pack: $1.99 [National rank: 14th (average state tax is $1.23 per pack)]

Program Success – California

In 1988, California voters approved Proposition 99, a ballot initiative that increased state cigarette taxes by 25 cents per pack, with 20 percent of the new revenues (over $100 million per year) earmarked for health education against tobacco use. California launched its new Tobacco Control Program in Spring 1990. Despite increased levels of tobacco marketing and promotion, a major cigarette price cut in 1993, tobacco company interference with the program, and periodic cuts in funding, the program has still reduced tobacco use and its attendant devastation substantially.
· California’s comprehensive approach has reduced adult smoking significantly. Adult smoking declined by 43 percent from 1988 to 2007, from 24.2 percent to 13.8 percent.8 If every state had California’s current smoking rate, there would be more than 16 million fewer smokers in the United States.
· Since the passage of Proposition 99, between 1988 and 2003, cigarette consumption in California declined by 60 percent, compared to just 38 percent for the country as a whole. Even after the tobacco industry’s successful efforts to reduce the state’s tobacco prevention funding, cigarette consumption still declined more in California than in the rest of the country.
· In the 10 years following the passage of Proposition 99, adult smoking in California declined at twice
the rate it declined in the previous decade.
· Between 1988 and 2003, lung and bronchus cancer rates in California declined at three times the rate
of decline as the rest of the U.S. Surveillance, Epidemiology, and End Results (SEER) data
associated lower lung cancer incidence with California’s program.
· In California, from 1996 to 2006, smoking declined by 45 percent among eighth grade students and
by 46 percent among tenth grade students. From 2000 to 2006, smoking prevalence decreased by
more than 20 percent among twelfth grade students.
The California tobacco control program produced much larger smoking reductions in the early years,
when it was funded at its highest levels, than during subsequent years, when the state cut its funding. For
example, when California cut the program’s funding in the mid 1990s, its progress in reducing adult and
youth smoking rates stalled, but it got back on track when program funding was partially restored.

TOBACCO PREVENTION AND CESSATION PROGRAMS

Tobacco control programs play a crucial role in the prevention of many chronic conditions such as cancer, heart disease, and respiratory illness. Comprehensive tobacco prevention and cessation programs prevent kids from starting to smoke, help adult smokers quit, educate the public, the media and policymakers about policies that reduce tobacco use, address disparities, and serve as a counter to the
ever-present tobacco industry.
Recommendations for state tobacco prevention and cessation programs are best summarized in the Center for Disease Control and Prevention’s Best Practices for Comprehensive Tobacco Control Programs. In this guidance document, CDC recommends that states establish tobacco control programs that are comprehensive, sustainable, and accountable and include state and community interventions, public education interventions, cessation programs, surveillance and evaluation and administration and management.
The empirical evidence regarding the effectiveness of comprehensive tobacco prevention and cessation
programs is vast and growing. There is more evidence than ever before that tobacco prevention and
cessation programs work to reduce smoking, save lives and save money. In 2007, the Institute of
Medicine and the President’s Cancer Panel all issued landmark reports that concluded there is
overwhelming evidence that state comprehensive state tobacco control programs substantially reduce
tobacco use and recommended that every state fund such programs at CDC-recommended levels.2
Data from numerous states that have implemented programs consistent with CDC guidelines show
significant reductions in youth and adult smoking. The most powerful evidence, however, comes from
national studies that look across states and control for as many of the relevant confounding factors as
possible. These rigorous studies consistently show effects of tobacco prevention and cessation programs.
A recent study published in the American Journal of Public Health, examined state tobacco prevention
and cessation funding levels from 1995 to 2003 and found that the more states spent on these programs,
the larger the declines they achieved in adult smoking, even when controlling for other factors such as
increased tobacco prices. The researchers also calculated that if every state had funded their programs
at the levels recommended by the U.S. Centers for Disease Control (CDC) during that period, there would
have been between 2.2 million and 7.1 million fewer smokers in the United States by 2003. The
Campaign for Tobacco-Free Kids estimates that such smoking declines would have saved between
700,000 and 2.2 million lives as well as between $20 billion and $67 billion in health care costs.
The study described above adds to earlier research, using similar methods, which demonstrated the
same type of relationship between program spending and youth smoking declines. A 2005 study
concluded that if every state had spent the minimum amount recommended by the CDC for tobacco
prevention, youth smoking rates nationally would have been between three and 14 percent lower during
the study period, from 1991 to 2000. Further, if every state funded tobacco prevention at CDC minimum
levels, states would prevent nearly two million kids alive today from becoming smokers, save more than

Tobacco Use in Maine

· High school students who smoke: 14.0% [Girls: 14.7% Boys: 13.3%]
· High school males who use smokeless tobacco: 9.2%
· Kids (under 18) who try cigarettes for the first time each year: 5,500
· Additional Kids (under 18) who become new regular, daily smokers each year: 1,600
· Packs of cigarettes bought or smoked by kids in Maine each year: 2.3 million
· Kids exposed to second hand smoke at home: 79,000
· Adults in Maine who smoke: 20.2% [Men: 21.1% Women: 19.3% Pregnant Females: 17.1%]
Nationwide, youth smoking has declined significantly since the mid-1990s, but that decline appears to have slowed. The
2007 Youth Risk Behavior Survey found that the percentage of high school students reporting that they have smoked
cigarettes in the past month decreased to 20 percent in 2007 from 23 percent in 2005. 19.8 percent of U.S. adults
(about 43.4 million) currently smoke, which is a significant decline from the 2006 rate of 20.8 percent.
Deaths in Maine From Smoking
· Adults who die each year in Maine from their own smoking: 2,200
· Adult nonsmokers who die each year from exposure to secondhand smoke: 220
· Maine kids who have lost at least one parent to a smoking-caused death: 1,100
· Kids alive in state today who will ultimately die from smoking: 27,000 (given current smoking levels)
Smoking, alone, kills more people each year than alcohol, AIDS, car crashes, illegal drugs, murders, and suicides
combined. For every person in Maine who dies from smoking approximately 20 more state residents are suffering from
serious smoking-caused disease and disability, or other tobacco-caused health problems.
Tobacco-Related Monetary Costs in Maine
· Annual health care expenditures in the State directly caused by tobacco use: $602 million
· Annual health care expenditures in Maine from secondhand smoke exposure: $22.9 million
 State Medicaid program’s total health expenditures caused by tobacco use: $216.0 million
· Citizens’ state/federal taxes to cover smoking-caused gov’t costs: $355.9 million ($654/household)
· Smoking-caused productivity losses in Maine: $534 million
· Smoking-caused health costs and productivity losses per pack sold in Maine: $11.60
The productivity loss amount, above, is from smoking-death-shortened work lives, alone. Additional work productivity
losses totaling in the tens of billions nationwide come from smoking-caused work absences, on-the-job performance
declines, and disability during otherwise productive work lives Other non-health costs caused by tobacco use include
direct residential and commercial property losses from smoking-caused fires (about $400 million nationwide); and the
costs of extra cleaning and maintenance made necessary by tobacco smoke and tobacco-related litter (about $4+ billion
per year for commercial establishments alone).
Tobacco Industry Advertising and Other Product Promotion
· Annual tobacco industry marketing expenditures nationwide: $13.4 billion ($36+ million per day)
· Estimated portion spent in Maine each year: $66.8 million
Published research studies have found that kids are three times more sensitive to tobacco advertising than adults and
are more likely to be influenced to smoke by cigarette marketing than by peer pressure, and that one-third of underage
experimentation with smoking is attributable to tobacco company marketing.
Maine Government Policies Affecting The Toll of Tobacco in Maine
· Annual State tobacco prevention spending from tobacco settlement and tax revenues: $11.7 million
[National rank: 6 (with 1 the best), based on percent of CDC recommendation]
· State cigarette tax per pack: $2.00 [National rank: 6th (average state tax is $1.23 per pack)]

Tobacco Use in Connecticut

· High school students who smoke: 21.1% [Girls: 22.6% Boys: 19.5%]
· High school males who use smokeless tobacco: 6.2%
· Kids (under 18) who try cigarettes for the first time each year: 15,500
· Additional Kids (under 18) who become new regular, daily smokers each year: 4,600
· Packs of cigarettes bought or smoked by kids in Connecticut each year: 9.7 million
· Kids exposed to second hand smoke at home: 186,000
· Adults in Connecticut who smoke: 15.4% [Men: 16.5% Women: 14.4% Pregnant Females: 7.0%]
Nationwide, youth smoking has declined significantly since the mid-1990s, but that decline appears to have slowed. The
2007 Youth Risk Behavior Survey found that the percentage of high school students reporting that they have smoked
cigarettes in the past month decreased to 20 percent in 2007 from 23 percent in 2005. 19.8 percent of U.S. adults
(about 43.4 million) currently smoke, which is a significant decline from the 2006 rate of 20.8 percent.
Deaths in Connecticut From Smoking
· Adults who die each year in Connecticut from their own smoking: 4,700
· Adult nonsmokers who die each year from exposure to secondhand smoke: 440
· Connecticut kids who have lost at least one parent to a smoking-caused death: 2,900
· Kids alive in state today who will ultimately die from smoking: 76,000 (given current smoking levels)
Smoking, alone, kills more people each year than alcohol, AIDS, car crashes, illegal drugs, murders, and suicides
combined. For every person in Connecticut who dies from smoking approximately 20 more state residents are suffering
from serious smoking-caused disease and disability, or other tobacco-caused health problems.
Tobacco-Related Monetary Costs in Connecticut
· Annual health care expenditures in the State directly caused by tobacco use: $1.63 billion
· Annual health care expenditures in Connecticut from secondhand smoke exposure: $45.1 million
. State Medicaid program’s total health expenditures caused by tobacco use: $430.0 million
· Citizens’ state/federal taxes to cover smoking-caused gov’t costs: $897.6 million ($680/household)
· Smoking-caused productivity losses in Connecticut: $1.03 billion
· Smoking-caused health costs and productivity losses per pack sold in Connecticut: $14.30
The productivity loss amount, above, is from smoking-death-shortened work lives, alone. Additional work productivity
losses totaling in the tens of billions nationwide come from smoking-caused work absences, on-the-job performance
declines, and disability during otherwise productive work lives Other non-health costs caused by tobacco use include
direct residential and commercial property losses from smoking-caused fires (about $400 million nationwide); and the
costs of extra cleaning and maintenance made necessary by tobacco smoke and tobacco-related litter (about $4+ billion
per year for commercial establishments alone).
Tobacco Industry Advertising and Other Product Promotion
· Annual tobacco industry marketing expenditures nationwide: $13.4 billion ($36+ million per day)
· Estimated portion spent in Connecticut each year: $124.1 million
Published research studies have found that kids are three times more sensitive to tobacco advertising than adults and
are more likely to be influenced to smoke by cigarette marketing than by peer pressure, and that one-third of underage
experimentation with smoking is attributable to tobacco company marketing.
Connecticut Government Policies Affecting The Toll of Tobacco in Connecticut
· Annual State tobacco prevention spending from tobacco settlement and tax revenues: $8.3 million
National rank: 29 (with 1 the best), based on percent of CDC recommendation
· State cigarette tax per pack: $2.00