Monthly Archives: May 2009

Crist signs cigarette-tax hike, calls it a ‘health issue’

Gov. Charlie Crist signed into law a $1-per-pack cigarette tax hike Wednesday - the biggest of its kind in Florida history — saying he hopes to kill the habit that results in thousands of deaths every year.

Cigarette producers to be probed over fake stamps

Customs and Excise officers will investigate the possible involvement of cigarette producers in cases of fake tax stamps that have caused state losses of Rp 1 trillion (about US95 million), an official has said.

Side Effects Make it Impossible to Quit Smoking

So many people want to quit smoking but they just keep giving up. Why is that? One reason is that smoking is very addictive. It’s easy to say you want to quit smoking and go through all of the steps to do so. However, it may be hard for you physically and emotionally to actually give up smoking.

Cigars industry flourished in Lebanon County

The Northeast was the major hub of activity for the industry before it spread to other parts of the country, he said.

Tobacco Taxes Up in Russia

Cigarettes prices were raised in a lot of countries. But recently this legislation came in Russia too. The world’s third-largest cigarette maker, Japan Tobacco Inc. said that Russian tobacco sales are rising as taxes force up the prices of budget opponents to its Winston and LD brands.
In a short period of time, from January to March, cigarette volumes in Russia raised 1.5 percent, said Masakazu Shimizu, executive Vice President.
Taxes on tobacco will be up until 2011 in Russia, where 42 percent of the population smokes, according to Japan Tobacco. Japan Tobacco involved Russia in its Rest of the World unit, which accounted for 17 percent of sales last year.
Tobacco taxes raised in UK markets too. Japan Tobacco’s U.K. market share rose to 39.2 percent in April from 38 percent a year earlier, the company said.
In the north and central Europe division, which includes the U.K., Japan Tobacco increased volumes by 3 percent in the first three months of the year, adding it expects to increase sales in Europe this year too.
Shimizu said he doesn’t believe the Japanese government has any concrete plans to sell its 50 percent stake in the Tobacco Company. Japanese new legislation requires Japan Tobacco to purchase all of its tobacco leaf from local farmers for domestic production.
Japan Tobacco, which purchased Gallaher Group Plc for 7.5 billion pounds ($11.4 billion) in 2007, will not make another similar-sized purchase in the next three years.
The maker of Camel and Mild Seven cigarettes, Japan Tobacco Inc. predict that profit would fall by 19 percent in April this year, worse than analysts considered, as demand falls in Japan, the strengthening yen weighs on overseas revenue, and costs rise from higher leaf tobacco prices.
Tobacco use has contributed greatly to Russia’s demographic crisis. Although Russia’s population of 143 million is approximately half that of the United States, Russian tobacco use kills almost as many people—some 400,000 per year—as it does in the U.S.
More than 60 percent of Russian men and up to 30 percent of Russian women smoke, making Russia’s adult smoking rate roughly double that of the United States, where about 20.8 percent of adults smoke. According to Euro monitor International, Russia ranks fourth worldwide in annual per-capita consumption, with some 2,665 cigarettes smoked, behind only Serbia and Montenegro, Greece and Bulgaria.

Are tobacco companies going too far?

As smoking bans become more popular, tobacco companies are developing new products and facing new criticism.

Japan Stocks: Funai, Japan Tobacco, Taiyo Yuden, JVC Kenwood

Japan’s Nikkei 225 Stock Average fell 7.85, or 0.1 percent, to 9,430.92 as of the midday trading break in Tokyo. The following are among the most active shares in the Japanese market today. Stock symbols are in parentheses after company names.

Smokeless tobacco bill could help recruit doctors

An increase in state taxes on smokeless tobacco supported by both houses of the Texas Legislature could make it easier for Fort Bend Family Health Center to recruit doctors.

The high cost of addiction

Government spending related to smoking and the abuse of alcohol and illegal drugs reached $468 billion in 2005, accounting for more than one-tenth of combined federal, state and local expenditures for all purposes, according to a new study.