tocacco plant Native American Tobaccoo flower, leaves, and buds

tocacco Tobacco is an annual or bi-annual growing 1-3 meters tall with large sticky leaves that contain nicotine. Native to the Americas, tobacco has a long history of use as a shamanic inebriant and stimulant. It is extremely popular and well-known for its addictive potential.

tocacco nicotina Nicotiana tabacum

tocacco Nicotiana rustica leaves. Nicotiana rustica leaves have a nicotine content as high as 9%, whereas Nicotiana tabacum (common tobacco) leaves contain about 1 to 3%

tocacco cigar A cigar is a tightly rolled bundle of dried and fermented tobacco which is ignited so that its smoke may be drawn into the mouth. Cigar tobacco is grown in significant quantities in Brazil, Cameroon, Cuba, Dominican Republic, Honduras, Indonesia, Mexico, Nicaragua, Sumatra, Philippines, and the Eastern United States.

tocacco Tobacco is an agricultural product processed from the fresh leaves of plants in the genus Nicotiana. It can be consumed, used as an organic pesticide, and in the form of nicotine tartrate it is used in some medicines. In consumption it may be in the form of cigarettes smoking, snuffing, chewing, dipping tobacco, or snus.

tocacco Cigarettes are smoking products consumed by people and made out of cut tobacco leaves. Cigars are typically composed completely of whole-leaf tobacco. A cigarette has smaller size, composed of processed leaf, and white paper wrapping. The term cigarette refers to a tobacco cigarette too but it can apply to similar devices containing other herbs, such as cannabis.
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Key actions on stopping the promotion of tobacco in England

Action to stop the promotion of tobacco products has been taken over many years. While the Tobacco Advertising and Promotion Act 2002 prohibits tobacco advertising, the tobacco industry continues to find ways of promoting tobacco products, for example through packaging, point of sale displays and through entertainment media, including the internet. Given the substantial health risks caused by tobacco use, the Government is committed to preventing the promotion of tobacco products to both young people and adults.

Key actions
The Government will:

  • implement the tobacco display provisions in the Health Act 2009 for large shops from April 2012 and for all other shops from April 2015;
  • consult on options to reduce the promotional impact of tobacco packaging, including plain packaging, before the end of 2011;
  • continue to defend tobacco legislation against legal challenges by the tobacco industry, including legislation to stop tobacco sales from vending machines from October 2011;
  • examine the impact that the advertising and promotion of smoking accessories, including cigarette papers, has on promoting the use of tobacco products and consider whether further action is needed;
  • work with media regulators and the entertainment industry around the portrayal of smoking in entertainment media;
  • consider whether the internet is being used to promote tobacco to young people in the UK and, if so, examine what more can be done on a global level; and
  • encourage local areas to consider action to further protect young people from exposure to smoking so they do not see it as a normal behaviour, reducing the likelihood of them becoming smokers.

Helping shape perceptions of tobacco use by young people

The more that smoking is seen to be a normal part of everyday life, the more likely it is that young people will take it up. As the Cabinet office behavioural Insights Team suggests in Applying behavioural insight to health:
We generally do what we see or think others are doing but an important twist is that our estimate of what other people are doing is often distorted.

We will encourage local authorities to examine what role they can play in helping to change social norms around smoking, particularly through using behavioural insights. young people can often overestimate the number of people smoking among the peer group and in the wider community, and this can drive smoking behaviour.

Display of tobacco products in shops

There is evidence that the display of tobacco products in shops can promote smoking by young people and undermine the resolve of adult smokers who are trying to quit. The Health Act 2009 ends the display of tobacco in shops.

The tobacco display provisions in the Health Act 2009 and related regulation will be implemented for large shops from April 2012 and for all other shops from April 2015. We will amend the regulations on stopping the display of tobacco to make the arrangements more practical for shop keepers to comply with in the day-to-day running of their businesses. These changes to the legislation ending tobacco displays in shops will especially support small businesses, in line with the Growth Review announced by the Chancellor of the Exchequer in november 2010.

Plain packaging of tobacco products

The Government will look at whether the plain packaging of tobacco products could be effective in reducing the number of young people who take up smoking and in supporting adult smokers who want to quit. The Government wants to make it easier for people to make healthy choices but wants to understand whether there is evidence to demonstrate that plain packaging would have an additional public health benefit. We will explore the competition, trade and legal implications, and the likely impact on the illicit tobacco market of options around tobacco packaging.

We will consult on options to reduce the promotional impact of tobacco packaging, including plain packaging, before the end of 2011.

Sale of tobacco from vending machines

We are robustly defending the legislation to stop the sale of tobacco products from vending machines against two judicial review cases brought by the tobacco industry. From 1 october 2011, tobacco products will no longer be sold from vending machines in England. As vending machines are self-service, they offer young people easy and poorly supervised access to tobacco. by ending this source of tobacco we will reduce the number of young people taking up smoking as well as extending a supportive environment for adult smokers who are trying to quit.

Advertising of smoking accessories

We are aware of the increasing prominence of the advertising and promotion of smoking accessories, such as cigarette papers, at large-scale public events such as music festivals. We will examine the impact that the advertising and promotion of smoking accessories has on promoting the use of tobacco and consider whether further action is needed.

Tobacco and the entertainment media

The portrayal of smoking in the entertainment media can create the false impression that tobacco use is a normal, or even glamorous, activity and it rarely shows the real life negative consequences of tobacco use. Smoking in the media can also give a false impression that tobacco use is more common than it actually is. We remain especially concerned about how these influences affect perceptions of social norms and how they encourage young people to take up smoking.

Guidelines on reducing images of smoking in television programmes and films directed towards children have been published by ofcom, the uK communications industries regulator. We will continue to work to reduce the depiction of smoking in the media, including through bringing together media regulators and the entertainment industry to consider what more can be done.

We will also consider whether the internet is being used to promote tobacco to young people in the uK. If this is the case, we will need to examine what more can be done on a global level, potentially through the World Health organization’s Framework Convention on Tobacco Control.

We will also explore ways to provide young people with information about risky behaviours that can affect their health, including tobacco use, and to help them develop their ability to resist pressures to take up smoking. This work is likely to involve digital media, due to its reach and popularity among young people.

HM Government, A Tobacco Control Plan for England

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