Daily Archives: November 9, 2011

TOBACCO TIMELINE

U.S. LEGISLATIVE HISTORY:
1933: The Agricultural Adjustment Act of 1933.
Tobacco farmers were being ruined as the market dropped, manufacturers hid their purchase plans and banks charged interest rates of up to 37%. 25% of all families in North Carolina were on relief as farmers appealed to the sympathetic Roosevelt administration. The Agricultural Adjustment Act guarantees price supports in exchange for limiting production via allotments and quotas; so long as farmers didn’t grow past their seasonally allotted acreage, the government would buy the unsold tobacco. The plan is dependent on close communication with manufacturers, and their upcoming buying needs. The bill has undergone many amendments over the years, the most important being the 1938 bill authorizing marketing quotas and the 1949 act authorizing price supports.
1935: The Tobacco Inspection Act is enacted by Congress. This act established the framework for development of official tobacco grade standards, authorized the Secretary of Agriculture to designate tobacco auction markets where tobacco growers would receive mandatory inspection of each lot of tobacco to determine its grade and type, and provided for the distribution of daily price reports showing the current average price for each grade. The Agricultural Marketing Service’s Tobacco Division was established to provide these services to the industry. (Other authorizing legislation: The Tobacco Adjustment Act; Public Law 99-198, Section 1161; The Naval Stores Act
1938: AGRICULTURAL ADJUSTMENT ACT is passed again, this time authorizing marketing quotas.
1949: AGRICULTURAL ADJUSTMENT ACT is passed again, this time authorizing price supports.
1965: The FEDERAL CIGARETTE LABELING AND ADVERTISING ACT is passed, requiring health warnings on cigarette packages only.

How Does Smoking Affect Athletes?

Lung Health
One of the main impacts of smoking on athletic performance is a decrease in lung function. The lungs consist of delicate membranes which are able to filter oxygen out of the air and send it into the bloodstream. Oxygen is essential for muscle function, especially during exercise, when muscles demand more oxygen. Smoking breaks down tiny hairs called cilia which are meant to prevent foreign bodies, such as dust and other particles, from interfering with respiration. Eventually the lungs become less efficient in drawing oxygen from the air, which can lead to asthma, bronchitis and other lung ailments. For athletes, this means a decrease in stamina and performance, as muscles that get inadequate oxygen become fatigued more quickly. Smokers also tend to suffer from shortness of breath more often than nonsmokers, as their muscles and heart demand more oxygen than their lungs are able to supply.

Tobacco Facts

The nicotine found in cigarettes and in smokeless tobacco is a powerful, addictive drug that acts on several parts of the body. Once addicted, it becomes difficult, but not impossible, to quit using smokeless tobacco or to stop smoking.
The use of tobacco products is not only addicting, but is directly related to a number of health problems and diseases. A few of the oral health problems smokers or smokeless tobacco users can develop are —
bad breath brown, stained teeth ground-down teeth
black hairy tongue gum disease and loss of teeth receding gums
cancers of the cheek, esophagus, lip, palate and tongue
Some of the harmful ingredients found in tobacco are —
arsenic formaldehyde dirt
fertilizer soot pesticides
cyanide manure nicotine
dead bugs
At least 19 different types of cancer-causing substances, called nitrosamines, are found in tobacco products.
Oral cancer is serious. When it spreads to the lymph nodes in the neck, it is often deadly.
Smokeless tobacco is not a harmless alternative to smoking. It is just as hazardous to your health as cigarettes. Protect your health; avoid all tobacco products.
The risk of developing lung cancer is 10 times greater for smokers than for non- smokers. Also, breathing second-hand smoke (someone else’s smoke) can be as dangerous as smoking.
Once you stop using tobacco products, your blood pressure, pulse rate and skin temperature will return to normal within 20 minutes. Within eight hours, high levels of carbon monoxide in your blood will return to normal and, within a few weeks, your circulation will improve, your sense of taste and smell will improve, and you will have fewer colds and more energy. It is never too late to stop!