Tag Archives: tobacco study

Cigarettes Are Enlisted to Test Ways of Quitting

When a truck recently delivered 45,000 cartons of cigarettes to a research company in North Carolina, it was a turning point in the government’s war on smoking.

Tobacco giant’s war on science

The world’s largest tobacco company is attempting to gain access to confidential information about British teenagers’ smoking habits.Philip Morris giant

Snus focus of yearlong study

A University of South Carolina researcher is preparing to answer two questions with widespread implications for the tobacco industry and public-health community.

Babies Who Sleep With Smoker Parents Exhibit High Nicotine Levels

“Passive smoking is the leading preventable cause of childhood death in developed countries”, Guadalupe Ortega, lead author of the research study and coordinator of the Atencio Primaria Sense Fum programme at the Department of Health of the Generalitat de Cataluna (Catalonia regional government) tells SINC.

Menthol Smokers Feel Twice-Addicted

PARSIPPANY, N.J., - A survey conducted this month, sponsored by GlaxoSmithKline Consumer Healthcare, uncovers the perceptions menthol cigarettesand habits of menthol cigarette smokers, particularly among African Americans, who disproportionately smoke menthols over any other group. The survey shows that menthol smokers feel “twice-addicted” – both to the menthol and to the tobacco – and most are attracted by the taste and feel of menthol cigarettes. Almost three-quarters (74 percent) of menthol smokers believe that menthol makes it easier for them to inhale, when almost 40 percent say that menthol flavoring is the only reason they smoke.

Chocolate, Alcohol and Cigarettes Top Abstinence List for 2011

MANCHESTER, England, - A study out today reveals that chocolate (44%), alcohol (20%) and cigarettes (17%) are the most popular cigarettes alcohol‘vices’ to cut out for the 40 days and 40 nights of Lent this year.

Women take up smoking as they get more power

GIVING women more political and economic control increases female smoking rates, a new study revealed yesterday.power women smoking

Decline in Smoking Prevalence - Minnesota, 1999-2010

Following the landmark 1998 settlement of the lawsuit, State of Minnesota versus philip-morris-companies et al., Minnesota implemented a series of tobacco control efforts to limit the harm caused by tobacco use. In 2001, quitline services for tobacco users without health insurance coverage for cessation services were introduced and statewide mass media campaigns publicizing them were initiated. In 2005, Minnesota imposed a $0.75 per pack tax on cigarettes, followed in 2009 by a $0.62 per pack increase in federal excise tax, contributing in large part to a more than $2 increase in the average price of cigarettes. In 2007, a comprehensive, statewide smoke-free law was passed. Using surveillance data from the Minnesota Adult Tobacco Survey (MATS) and cigarette pack sales data, this report examines the effects of these tobacco-related public health efforts. Compared with a 15% decline in national adult smoking prevalence since 1999, adult smoking prevalence in Minnesota decreased 27.1%, from 22.1% in 1999 to 16.1% in 2010. During the same period, per capita cigarette sales in Minnesota decreased 40%. In addition, in 2010 compared with 1999, a higher percentage of adults reported that smoking was restricted in their homes (87.2% versus 64.5%), and adults were less likely to report exposure to secondhand smoke (45.6% versus 67.2%). In the past decade, Minnesota has benefited from sustained tobacco control. Future progress in decreasing adult smoking and reducing exposure to secondhand smoke will depend on a concerted effort across the public health community to keep tobacco control a priority.

Missouri study shows racial gap in mortality from heart disease, cancer

An estimated 443,000 deaths in the United States occur each year as a result of cigarette smoking and exposure to secondhand smoke. These deaths cost the nation approximately $97 billion in lost productivity and $96 billion in health-care costs. During 2000-2004 in Missouri, smoking caused 9,600 deaths, 132,000 years of potential life lost (YPLL), $2.4 billion in productivity losses, and $2.2 billion in smoking-related health-care expenditures annually. To limit the adverse health consequences of tobacco use, states implement comprehensive tobacco control programs that identify disparities among population groups and target those disproportionately affected by tobacco use. This report compares the public health burden of smoking among whites and blacks in Missouri by estimating the number of smoking-attributable deaths and YPLL in these population subgroups during 2003-2007. The findings indicate that the average annual smoking-attributable mortality (SAM) rate in the state was 18% higher for blacks (338 deaths per 100,000) than for whites (286 deaths per 100,000). The relative difference in smoking-attributable mortality rates between blacks and whites was larger for men (28%) than women (11%). For Missouri, these estimates provide an important benchmark for measuring the success of tobacco control programs in decreasing the burden of smoking-related diseases in these populations and reaffirm the need for full implementation of the state’s comprehensive tobacco control program.